Countless people have instructed you not to do it. Parents and educators across different timezones are pulling faces, arms crossed, and eyebrows raised, judging your ability to “adult” right now.

But life isn’t predictable.

The best students may not admit it, but a good lot of them have definitely pulled an all-nighter, or two.   

Tonight will be a late night. Tonight you will pull an all-nighter…or at least attempt to pull one off. Previously, you may have only huffed half way up Mt. All-Nighter before you K.O.-ed at a nearby camp I know as “I swear, Rupin, I had the sixth sense around 4:30am”.

Since that night, I have honed my ability to pull the odd all-nighter (please for your own sake, do not do this regularly, but if life calls for it, one or two must be done). There is no photographic evidence capturing my all-nighter mastery, though I doubt anyone would want to bear witness to that pretty picture. But I assure you that I have pulled an all-nighter successfully — that is, I have completed whichever work was due imminently without feeling like utter death the morning of said assignment’s submission.

  1. LIGHTS. Turn on the lights in your room. Imitating day-time conditions will “trick” your body out of sleep. In fact, I know many teachers and PhDs that have sunlight-imitating Philips Hue Bulbs installed in their study lamps to keep them grading papers and reading ancient texts through the night.  
  1. HEAT. Your body falls best asleep when it’s slightly below room temperature. By putting on an extra layer, or cranking up the thermostat, you will keep awake and alert.
  1. WATER. I have never heard of anyone falling asleep while holding their bladders. An odd cup of coffee will do this too, but keep coffee and sodas available only when your eyelids feel especially heavy. Energy drinks are a big NO at anytime or place.

To reiterate the beginning of this post, please do not do this regularly. Do not make all-nighters a habit. Find healthier student habits here.

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